Loch Ness monster’s movie doppelganger found on lake bottom

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This shadowy something is what someone says is a photo of the Loch Ness monster in Scotland.

The Loch Ness monster has surfaced again — kind of.

An underwater robot prowling around the depths of the monster’s namesake Scottish lake recently made an unexpected discovery, according to tourism officials.

The robot turned up not Nessie herself, but a prop left over from a 1970 film in which the famous creature made a cameo appearance.

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The picture, Billy Wilder’s “The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes,” has the famous fictional private eye hot on Nessie’s tail, only to discover the would-be monster is a submarine. However, during the 1969 making of the movie, the submarine monster sank to the depths of the lake.

In theory, the robot has sort of achieved its goal, which was to find the eponymous monster.

“We have found a monster, but not the one many people might have expected,” Adrian Shine, a leader of the Loch Ness Project, told BBC. The model monster was built with a neck and two humps, but the director asked that they be removed “despite warnings I suspect from the rest of the production that this would affect its buoyancy,” Shine said.

This 1969 photo shows the fiberglass model of the Loch Ness monster being made for the film “The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes.”Ian Tyas/Getty Images

This 1969 photo shows the fiberglass model of the Loch Ness monster being made for the film “The Private Life of Sherlock Holmes.”

“And the inevitable happened. The model sank.” Now, that model has come back to life with the new underwater survey, backed by tourism group VisitScotland, which is hoping to find the mythic monster.

Although they didn’t quite find what they were hoping for, tourism officials were still pretty pleased with the discovery.

“Operation Groundtruth has uncovered a recognizable creature,” a VisitScotland spokesman told The Irish Times.

A Munin robot, operated by Norwegian company Kongsberg Maritime, is shown here hunting for Nessie in April 2016.Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

A Munin robot, operated by Norwegian company Kongsberg Maritime, is shown here hunting for Nessie in April 2016.

“Although it is the shape of Nessie, it is not the remains of the monster that has mystified the world for 80 years, but a star of the silver screen.”

Konsberg Maritime will conduct the underwater survey over a two-week period.

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Crews will spend two weeks looking for the Loch Ness monster.Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Crews will spend two weeks looking for the Loch Ness monster.

“There will always be a sense of mystery and the unknown around what really lies beneath Loch Ness,” Malcolm Roughead, VisitScotland’s chief executive, told the Associated Press.

Although accounts of a monster in the waters of Loch Ness date back at least 1,500 years, Nessie became part of modern myth when The Inverness Courier printed a local couple’s account of a supposed sighting, according to The History Channel.

The creature hit the bigtime in 1934 when the famous, blurry black-and-white photo emerged of a long-necked monster poking out of the water.

kblakinger@nydailynews.com

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